I read the book Free: The Future of a Radical Price by Chris Anderson this year and it completely blew my mind.

A sign in blue that reads free

Anderson talks about the rift in the mindsets of people over 30 and people under 30 when it comes to “free.”  

Those over 30 grew up hearing, “Nothing is free.”  “You don’t get something for nothing.”  They had first-hand experiences with snake oil salesmen and “free” trials that ended up having a hefty price tag.

Those under 30 have an entirely different perspective.  They were born into Myspace, Google, Youtube, Flickr.  They live in a world where information is free, music is free, blogs are free.  They’ve come to expect it.

What will this do to the wedding industry?  EWedNews explores this idea in this new article  here: “Subscriptions Can’t Compete With Free Exchange of Information

My question is this: Are we going to fight the push for free information or are we going to use it to build our businesses?

I know which one I’m going to choose!

Sure, information is abundant and that which is abundant becomes very, very cheap.  On the other hand, with so much information available…what becomes scarce?

TIME.  We have everything at our fingertips and so many choices, but no time to sift through them.  

SPACE.  We have such an abundance of stuff that we have nowhere to put it.

RELATIONSHIPS.  With everyone spending so much time online, we don’t connect with people in person any more.

While information gets cheaper and cheaper, our time gets more precious, more expensive.  Time-savers are selling like hotcakes.  Storage facilities are filled to capacity.  Online dating services are making millions.

When one resource dries up, let’s look for the opportunity.  Instead of fighting the trend, let’s embrace it and find a way to make money where things are scarce.

What do you think about the wave of free information and how it is affecting the wedding business?  Leave a comment and let’s stir up some discussion!

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Stephanie Padovani

Stephanie is a Hudson Valley wedding insider, blogger, writer, and wedding business coach. Want to book more weddings at higher prices? Quit dealing with price shoppers? Transform your wedding business so that it supports the life you really want? Look her up! They don't call her the Wedding Business Cheerleader for nothing. :)

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0 thoughts on “If Everything Is Free for Today’s Bride, What Do We Have Left to Sell?”

  1. Anonymous says:

    I’m worried that getting so much information for free will create a lot less job opportunities for people who make a living off of selling information. Its great for the consumer but what about the sellers?

    1. [quote name=”Calgary Invitations”]I’m worried that getting so much information for free will create a lot less job opportunities for people who make a living off of selling information. Its great for the consumer but what about the sellers?[/quote]

      If sellers stick with what they’ve always done, it’s definitely not going to be good for them.

      But we can’t fight the “free” wave. Digital data is cheap and only getting cheaper. Why not embrace it and find the opportunity, like the one Darlene mentions?

      If information is cheap and free, what is rare and scarce? Selling that will be extremely profitable.

      For example, if the information is free, can you sell an “elegant organization” of that information?

      You might not be able to sell the tips, but you CAN sell the system for using them. Or the customization of them.

      Where is the opportunity for your market?

  2. Anonymous says:

    I say let’s make money off the market we’re “scared” of!! So, for instance, if a DJ is feeling threatened by the iPod Bride, he could offer a workshop/class that shows guidelines for proper timing of music, music selections for ALL ages of wedding guests, etc. This way he is making money off the very Bride he’s afraid of losing money to. I hope that made sense! In regards to the “free” information, I say use it to build our businesses. Think like a Bride, right? Before technology, Brides were overwhelmed because they couldn’t FIND the information to get started. Now there’s SO MUCH information at their fingertips they need someone to help them sift through it. Like Stedman said, “We don’t have to change our entire business but perhaps tweak some of our offerings.”

    1. [quote name=”Darlene”]I say let’s make money off the market we’re “scared” of!! [/quote]

      Darlene, you absolutely make sense and this is BRILLIANT.

      I’ve been learning that the thing we’re most scared of is usually exactly what we need to do. Turn those fears into an opportunity.

      I know a florist who now offers DIY classes for brides who can’t afford her services. She makes money off that “scary” DIY market she wouldn’t have been able to serve, and many of those DIY brides end up hiring her anyway when they realize how tough it is.

      [quote name=”Darlene”]In regards to the “free” information, I say use it to build our businesses. Think like a Bride, right? [/quote]

      YES! When one thing becomes abundance, another becomes scarce. Find the thing brides DON’T have access to and use it to get their business.

      Brilliant.

  3. Anonymous says:

    As a side note, in the eWed news article you mentioned, I read this sentence 3x and still don’t know what it means…
    “..has resulted in net loss at all the tradition medium levels and is now creating a traffic jam in its own arena under the digital category.”

    huh?

    1. Stedman!

      That statement [i]is[/i] a little…cryptic. I think he’s trying to say is that the digital distribution of information has shrunken the profit margin in the print and music industry, and now it’s resulting in an over-abundance of information in its own newly emerging digital industry.

      In other words, it just keeps getting cheaper and more abundant, so there ain’t no money there no more. I think.

      Either that or there is a new wedding tradition called digital log jamming? 😆

  4. Anonymous says:

    Great post Stephanie. I saw the eWed news post yesterday and was a bit curious as to how my business could respond to the ‘new’ mindset.
    Your insight that Time, Space and Relationships is a great pointer as to where to focus some of my marketing bullet points.
    We don’t have to change our entire business but perhaps tweak some of our offerings to highlight Time saving and Space saving aspects.

    Excellent post. Thanks.
    M. Stedman

  5. Anonymous says:

    Great insight into the consumers mentality.. And my kids way of thinking!!!

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